Joey Peters is a writer, cartoonist and beauty contest champion. Promise.

Anonymous asked:

Can't you stop being so uptight and pedantic and just enjoy a good story?

su3su2u1:

No

What does a “good story” have to do with Harry Potter and the Smugness of Atheists?

Herbie the Fat Fury. This guy is Alan Moore’s favorite superhero

Herbie the Fat Fury. This guy is Alan Moore’s favorite superhero

A doodle I did at Boston Comic Con

A doodle I did at Boston Comic Con

creepingmonsterism asked:

There's also a prose series called "Super-Wizard from Space" by Wil Alambre which has some fantastic Silver Age weirdness filtered through a Fletcher Hanksian lens. Stardust faces enemies like the Secret Living Language and the Super-Devil from Double-Hell (who is secretly his old ally, the Diabolical Devilman)

twentypercentcooler:

benito-cereno:

Well, all right. Here you go, anyone interested in that.

I NEED TO KNOW LITERALLY EVERYTHING ABOUT THE SUPER-DEVIL FROM DOUBLE-HELL.

Sweet Christmas. I was pretty impressed with myself when I realized I wrote and drew more pages featuring Stardust than Fletcher Hanks did himself (I’m the dude that did Super Wizard.net) but this guy just might have me beat. Some napkin math indicates he’s written like 500 pages of the adventures of Stardust.

lifeascomics:
The world’s been waiting too long for a grim and gritty reboot of Pizzaman

lifeascomics:

The world’s been waiting too long for a grim and gritty reboot of Pizzaman

everydamncomic:

CHAINSAW VIGILANTE #2 New England Comics. By Ben Edlund and Zander Cannon. 1993.

Some early, very pretty, Zander Cannon work.

CSV is probably the most indy comix thing New England Comics ever published.

Criminals are a superstitious and cowardly lot. I shall become a quail!

theanimationarchive:

I don’t even have to tell you why this is important or why you should support the Kickstarter to bring back Reading Rainbow; you know why. So go do it!

coelasquid:

(Full size image here)
Little piece of digital inking advice I’ve learned from years of doing this sort of thing for projects with strict style guides;
Okay, so, anyone who has experience with digital inking knows the temptation to zoom in and out constantly to tinker with all of your details at different levels. The problem is, this freedom to enhance all you like can get you lost in the rabbit hole of tweaking details at 300% that look aesthetically awful at regular web viewing and print size. It’s an easy way to lose track of the big picture.
When I was on Ugly Americans, one of our most tightly enforced rules on the show was a set zoom level. You had one brush size and one zoom level, and everything on screen had to have the same lineweight. As Aaron Augenblick told us “you can’t zoom in on paper.” This is a piece of advice I’ve carried with me to this day, because I realized even if you aren’t going for a stylistically intentional uniform lineweight, it really helps keep your art decluttered and create easy atmospheric perspective in your line work.
When I was doing the short Nicky Two-vests pitch comic it was really my first time working on a big, print-size 11x17 comic page. The first couple pages I did I couldn’t resist the temptation to go in and utilize the ridiculous resolution to add little finnicky details all over the place. The result was awful and basically had to be redone. That was when I decided to try out this technique, choosing a fixed brush size and fixed zoom level for different depth of field and sticking to that. It helps keep the important focus of the image big and bold, the background subdued
For my personal use, I ink with the Frenden Hairpin Sable in Manga Studio 5EX which readjusts to be the same size on screen as you zoom, but the same technique works in photoshop if you adjust the brush to approximately the same size on screen as you go.

coelasquid:

(Full size image here)

Little piece of digital inking advice I’ve learned from years of doing this sort of thing for projects with strict style guides;

Okay, so, anyone who has experience with digital inking knows the temptation to zoom in and out constantly to tinker with all of your details at different levels. The problem is, this freedom to enhance all you like can get you lost in the rabbit hole of tweaking details at 300% that look aesthetically awful at regular web viewing and print size. It’s an easy way to lose track of the big picture.

When I was on Ugly Americans, one of our most tightly enforced rules on the show was a set zoom level. You had one brush size and one zoom level, and everything on screen had to have the same lineweight. As Aaron Augenblick told us “you can’t zoom in on paper.” This is a piece of advice I’ve carried with me to this day, because I realized even if you aren’t going for a stylistically intentional uniform lineweight, it really helps keep your art decluttered and create easy atmospheric perspective in your line work.

When I was doing the short Nicky Two-vests pitch comic it was really my first time working on a big, print-size 11x17 comic page. The first couple pages I did I couldn’t resist the temptation to go in and utilize the ridiculous resolution to add little finnicky details all over the place. The result was awful and basically had to be redone. That was when I decided to try out this technique, choosing a fixed brush size and fixed zoom level for different depth of field and sticking to that. It helps keep the important focus of the image big and bold, the background subdued

For my personal use, I ink with the Frenden Hairpin Sable in Manga Studio 5EX which readjusts to be the same size on screen as you zoom, but the same technique works in photoshop if you adjust the brush to approximately the same size on screen as you go.

twentypercentcooler:

twentypercentcooler:

Elliot S! Maggin, Miracle Monday

Happy Miracle Monday, everyone!

twentypercentcooler:

twentypercentcooler:

Elliot S! Maggin, Miracle Monday

Happy Miracle Monday, everyone!